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Diminuer l’impact des troubles obsessionnels compulsifs par des modifications de l’environnement physique. Une étude de preuve de concept

Abstract : Obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) is conventionally considered a neuropsychiatric disease. Currently available therapeutic approaches are designed to act on the intrapsychic functioning of individuals/patients, by pharmacological and/or psychotherapeutic means. Although their efficacy has been proven, some problems persist and have a functional impact that can sometimes be disabling, which means we still have to find new solutions to complement treatment. In this perspective, we have developed an approach that broadens our view from strictly individual mechanisms which are targeted by current therapeutic approaches, towards thinking about people within the context of their interaction with the environment. We assume that the environment can promote or not the expression of OCD and that there are “OCD-genic” elements (OCD generators) and “OCD-lytics” ones (OCD destructive). When they are showing OCD symptoms, people express their compulsions in relation with the items in their environment with which they have a OCD-ified relationship. According to this hypothesis, it is possible to act by technical or technology means specifically designed to influence the mechanisms of this relationship. We present the results of a proof of concept study aiming to empirically test this hypothesis and which is based on an innovative methodology of participatory design.
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https://hal-cnrs.archives-ouvertes.fr/hal-03479196
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Submitted on : Tuesday, December 14, 2021 - 11:15:20 AM
Last modification on : Thursday, September 1, 2022 - 11:06:28 AM

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  • HAL Id : hal-03479196, version 1

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Margot Morgiève, Yannick Ung, C Gehamy, Xavier Briffault. Diminuer l’impact des troubles obsessionnels compulsifs par des modifications de l’environnement physique. Une étude de preuve de concept. Le Journal des psychologues, 2016, 14 (3), pp.43-63. ⟨hal-03479196⟩

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