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Controlling aminosilane layer thickness to extend the plasma half-life of stealth persistent luminescence nanoparticles in vivo

Abstract : Therapeutics and diagnostics both initiated the development and rational design of nanoparticles intended for biomedical applications. Yet, the fate of these nanosystems in vivo is hardly manageable and generally results in their rapid uptake by the mononuclear phagocyte system, i.e. liver and spleen. To overcome this essential limitation, efforts have been made to understand the influence of physicochemical parameters on the behaviour of nanoparticles in vivo and on their ability to be uptaken by phagocytic cells. Notably, polyethylene glycol grafting and precise control of its density have not only been shown to prevent protein adsorption on the surface of nanoparticles, but also to significantly reduce macrophage uptake in vitro. In this article, we suggest the use of persistent luminescence to study the influence of another parameter, aminosilane layer thickness, on both in vitro protein adsorption and in vivo biodistribution of stealth persistent nanophosphors.
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https://hal-cnrs.archives-ouvertes.fr/hal-03290571
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Submitted on : Monday, July 19, 2021 - 1:41:12 PM
Last modification on : Tuesday, October 19, 2021 - 11:02:05 AM

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Thomas Maldiney, Maxime Remond, Michel Bessodes, Daniel Scherman, Cyrille Richard. Controlling aminosilane layer thickness to extend the plasma half-life of stealth persistent luminescence nanoparticles in vivo. Journal of materials chemistry‎ B, Royal Society of Chemistry, 2015, 3 (19), pp.4009-4016. ⟨10.1039/c5tb00146c⟩. ⟨hal-03290571⟩

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